Friday, June 5, 2009

Why Aren’t You Twittering With Your Customers?

Did you ever wonder why someone would use Twitter to tell the world their cat looks so cute? Or why a person would devote more attention to their Facebook than to their neighbors?

Stop wondering — and start finding ways to make people’s social media obsession pay off for your company. The psychology behind users’ online activities isn’t necessarily important; the fact that people are online and engaged is. As a retailer, you need to create ways to capitalize on this desire to interact, to have a voice, and to be heard on the web.

One recent story about social media caught my eye, because it focused on how small businesses are now embracing it, though perhaps not as effectively as they should. The article cited a recent Sage Software and AMI-Partners study, which found that the top three reasons small businesses use social media are: 1) for responding to customer questions, 2) for networking, and 3) for reference and educational purposes.

The article also suggested, however, that too few businesses are using it to actively influence purchasing decisions. Does that describe your company?

Why not use Twitter to promote an upcoming 10% off sale, or Tweet about the special deals you’re offering on overstocked inventory? Does your Facebook page deliver an impactful message to potential customers, or is it formulaic, cookie-cutter, and forgettable?

Along those lines, I’m working on a story about the impact of social media on retail, and I’m looking for retailer experiences, opinions, and feedback. Are you social-media savvy and getting results you’d like to share? Do you have success stories to pass along, or know someone who does? Maybe social media isn’t working for you, or you think it’s an overhyped fad. Let me know that as well. You can click here to send me an e-mail, or post your comments to this blog below.

4 comments:

  1. For the retailer, Twitter, Facebook and other vehicles for reaching the mobile web user are a means to convert these netizens into customers. For store-based retailers, it is to drive traffic. Assuming these vehicles are successful, once the netizen reaches the store, the retailer needs to continue to communicate with the mobile web device in an ever more meaningful way bringing it into the store's network in a secure manner delivering useful information to assist in shopping activities and allowing a real-time connection back to the social media sites if the customer so chooses.

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  2. Great points, Vic. Have you had success with any specific ways to communicate with netizens once you've moved them to the store? Discounts, special offers?

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